Question: What Are Communicable Diseases Give Examples?

What are some example of communicable diseases?

Some examples of reportable communicable disease include HIV, hepatitis A, B and C, measles, salmonella, measles, and blood-borne illnesses.

Most common forms of spread include fecal-oral, food, sexual intercourse, insect bites, contact with contaminated fomites, droplets, or skin contact..

What are the 4 types of communicable diseases?

Communicable diseasesInfluenza. Norovirus. Mumps. Tuberculosis.Pertussis. Zika virus. West Nile virus.Ebola. Chikungunya virus. Coronavirus (COVID-19)

Who is at risk of communicable diseases?

Key risk factors include crowded conditions, forced displacement, poor quality shelter, poor water, sanitation and hygiene, lack of healthcare facilities and lack of adequate surveillance.

What are the 10 non communicable diseases?

Alzheimer’s Disease.Cancer.Epilepsy.Osteoarthritis.Osteoporosis.Cerebrovascular Disease (Stroke)Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)Coronary Artery Disease.More items…

How many types of communicable disease are there?

Types and symptoms. Four main types of pathogens cause infection: Viruses, bacteria, fungi, and protists.

What are the 10 communicable diseases?

List of Communicable DiseasesCRE.Ebola.Enterovirus D68.Flu.Hantavirus.Hepatitis A.Hepatitis B.HIV/AIDS.More items…

What are communicable diseases give examples Class 8?

These can be spread from one person to another hence are also called communicable disease. For example cholera, malaria, chickenpox.

What is the most common communicable disease?

The 5 Most Common Infectious DiseasesHepatitis B. According to current statistics, hepatitis B is the most common infectious disease in the world, affecting some 2 billion people — that’s more than one-quarter of the world’s population. … Malaria. … Hepatitis C. … Dengue. … Tuberculosis.

Which is a communicable disease?

Communicable diseases, also known as infectious diseases or transmissible diseases, are illnesses that result from the infection, presence and growth of pathogenic (capable of causing disease) biologic agents in an individual human or other animal host.